Day 3: Traveling from Tehran to Isfahan

By Sushila Cherian

As rain into the same river which flows, still with its two names. At the Peace Museum, he likened it to nations using words to make treaties, honor them, break them, work around them, give them different verbiage, but they are the same words. I could have stayed there for hours, and upon leaving, we were gifted with Prof Ahmadzadeh’s book, a pack of notecards and a DVD.  It was with regret that I left this beautifully run, well organized and maintained Peace Museum - one of over 100 similar museums around the world.

Then we were on to the bus on our way to Isfahan. We stopped for lunch at the Borzogi Restaurant with its huge array of delicious food.      
Breaking the monotony of the long bus trip, we had a minor “situation” with a ‘lining’ of one of the tires being faulty, and had to stop while repairs were quickly done by our intrepid driver. Meanwhile, from clear across the opposite side of the highway this man hops out of his van, runs across 6 lanes of traffic going in opposite directions to offer help! I momentarily wondered whether this was an unannounced, planned part of the tour, and quickly disabused myself of that thought in favor of believing in the generous Iranian hospitality spoke of often. But….. I digress… 

We reached the Safire Hotel, checked in, and some of us decided to go for a walk to stretch our legs and enjoy the very pleasant cooler weather. Some stayed in while the rest of us went to get a bite to eat, ending with a lovely bracing walk back to the hotel. And thus endeth the day.
Goodnight everyone! Tomorrow is Isfahan!

P.S. I need to share with you that we have phenomenal guides, always looking out for us, always ready with answers to my innumerable questions, and treating us, each in their own individual way, like family. They truly are a fine imitation of helicopter parents, hovering over us, and telling us mainly what not to do!  I cannot say enough about their professionalism, competence and caring.

Comments

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  • Colonel Ann Wright
    commented 2019-10-23 12:25:06 -0400
    The Tehran Peace Museum is really important—to remind us of the horrific war from 1980-1988 in which Sadaam Hussein’s Iraq attacked Iran, only one year after the revolution— and used chemical weapons/gases on Iranians—and later on its own Iraqi citizens. Over 1 million killed—and huge cemeteries that are revered in Iran.